Hack Proof: Why we tend to overlook the simple when protecting computer

Computer privacy will forever be a hot topic, when you throw in not only the hackers and how they find ways new tricks to maneuver through capturing your identity or how we, as the general public, still find ways to overlook the obvious when it comes to protecting ourselves from one day to the next.

The two that easily stand out as glaring and easily avoidable are both related to online use: banking and user names and passwords.

The banking one is quite simple. You should always bank online when you’re using a secured internet connection, rather than randomly checking that account any other way (even your phone on your wireless carrier signal). Most banking missteps occur when you start doing any sort of bill paying that isn’t within the comfort of your home with your password protecting internet service.

The user names and passwords one is another that screams simplicity but often is overlooked on two levels. First, you should make it a habit to change your password on a regular basis, rather than just leaving it the same for months at a time. Furthermore, it’s imperative that you log out of accounts each time you are finished, whether that’s an email or if you’re online paying a credit card bill. Logging out might not seem like that big of a deal but it can lead to theft of credit cards, for example, or someone using your identity or card numbers to spend money that isn’t theirs and technically not yours, in the case of stolen credit cards.

The combination of staying logged in and not using a secured, encrypted network is only going to be part of the solution to protecting your computer privacy. You have to remind yourself, too, that opening unsolicited emails or clicking on links of that same ilk are equally bad for you. Anything that seems as though it’s too good to be true (make money fast scheme) or even an email from a trusted source that could be fake can lead to all kinds of password and identity issues online and also a computer break in you simply don’t want to deal with whatsoever. One of the bigger computer privacy scams comes in the form of those who are having computer issues and receiving random calls from “tech support” wanting to remote into your PC. This happens with some regularity but anyone asking for credit card information over the phone and telling you they’ll be able to help with your computer without you doing so much as a thing to get the call is a huge, monumental red flag.

As much as you want to believe that remembering a password or clicking a link is harmless, it’s the exact opposite. You’re undoubtedly putting your identity, your money and your computer at risk.