Privacy Plan: Keeping your PC protected from hackers is all about diligence

Five words no PC owner wants to hear: “Your computer has been hacked.”

The feeling that washes over your entire body is one of fear, can range from trying to ask the question why and rehashing exactly what could have happened.

You may try to reason with yourself that you took all the steps necessary to keep this from happening, then begin wondering if you really were as safe and sound or if you had some sort of loophole in your game plan.

How exactly can you work a little harder to keep your PC safe?

A lot of it rests on that slip up of sorts when you make your PC so available because you’re too set on convenience. What exactly does that mean? Think public WiFi and how often you use it for something as simple as checking email or as complicated and ill conceived as online banking.

The latter opens you up to hackers getting bank account information, at the very least and siphoning money from accounts before you realize it or your virtual wallet or online bank realizes what has happened.

Searching your internet history hardly is the worst thing that can happen, but that history also plays into just how easily hackers can get into your account. From pop up adds to sites that are easily hacked to junk email that you shouldn’t open, plenty of us have struggled with avoiding clicking on or visiting sites that are less than desirable as far as protecting your computer.
You also have to remember that your browser isn’t a default or a decision you don’t need to make. Internet Explorer is fine
A recent report suggested that the smart PC users and computer owners in general change passwords on a consistent basis. That means the log in screen and any password that you choose to save when the dialog box pops up and asks you want to save this password for this site.

Chances are when you’re talking about your email, you’ve given the green light to save a password and lived to regret it when that email password, when you type it in, all of a sudden says your password is wrong.

Then, you’re trying to track down Yahoo or Google to switch a password that you know you didn’t forget but rather someone else found. Some invest in password generator software, which devises a password that is so complex and strong that hackers have a hard time figuring it out, especially when you’re not adept at changing them enough to be different from the last.

You don’t have to be a victim of computer privacy not working in your favor as long as you’re taking the steps necessary to prevent it over and above what you’re already doing.